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  • (FILES) In this file photo taken on April 25, 2019, Sudanese protesters open their smartphones lights as they gather for a "million-strong" march outside the army headquarters in the capital Khartoum. - Few of the pro-democracy protesters who took the Middle East by storm a decade ago had a flag to raise or a leader to follow. But all of them had a song to sing. One of the most powerful musical moments of the Arab uprisings took place in central Khartoum in 2019, when Sudanese rapper Ayman Mao climbed on stage. On April 25, having flown straight to Khartoum from the US, he grabbed a microphone at the main sit-in site, and intoned one of his most famous songs: "Blood". With every line, the crowd answered "Thawra (revolution)". But a few weeks later, the title of what had become the revolution's anthem took on new significance. (Photo by OZAN KOSE / AFP) (Photo by OZAN KOSE/AFP via Getty Images)

  • (FILES) In this file photo taken on April 25, 2019, Sudanese protesters wave the national flag during a "million-strong" march outside the army headquarters in the capital Khartoum. - Few of the pro-democracy protesters who took the Middle East by storm a decade ago had a flag to raise or a leader to follow. But all of them had a song to sing. One of the most powerful musical moments of the Arab uprisings took place in central Khartoum in 2019, when Sudanese rapper Ayman Mao climbed on stage. On April 25, having flown straight to Khartoum from the US, he grabbed a microphone at the main sit-in site, and intoned one of his most famous songs: "Blood". With every line, the crowd answered "Thawra (revolution)". But a few weeks later, the title of what had become the revolution's anthem took on new significance. (Photo by ASHRAF SHAZLY / AFP) (Photo by ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP via Getty Images)

  • (FILES) In this file photo taken on December 11, 2019, protesters chant slogans as they march during a demonstration outside the Interior Ministry headquarters in the Lebanese capital Beirut. - Few of the pro-democracy protesters who took the Middle East by storm a decade ago had a flag to raise or a leader to follow. But all of them had a song to sing. "Hela Ho" was perhaps not the most poetic of protest songs, but it became the undisputed mega-hit amid the demos that erupted in Lebanon on October 17, 2019. It's chorus crudely takes aim at then foreign minister Gebran Bassil and the president's son-in-law -- the face of everything the protesters wanted to get rid of: corruption, political dynasties and incompetence. (Photo by IBRAHIM AMRO / AFP) (Photo by IBRAHIM AMRO/AFP via Getty Images)

  • (FILES) In this file photo taken on April 25, 2019, Sudanese protesters open their smartphones lights as they gather for a "million-strong" march outside the army headquarters in the capital Khartoum. - Few of the pro-democracy protesters who took the Middle East by storm a decade ago had a flag to raise or a leader to follow. But all of them had a song to sing. One of the most powerful musical moments of the Arab uprisings took place in central Khartoum in 2019, when Sudanese rapper Ayman Mao climbed on stage. On April 25, having flown straight to Khartoum from the US, he grabbed a microphone at the main sit-in site, and intoned one of his most famous songs: "Blood". With every line, the crowd answered "Thawra (revolution)". But a few weeks later, the title of what had become the revolution's anthem took on new significance. (Photo by OZAN KOSE / AFP) (Photo by OZAN KOSE/AFP via Getty Images)

  • (FILES) In this file photo taken on December 1, 2019, Protesters chant slogans, bang pot covers, and wave a Lebanese national flag during an anti-government demonstration in the southern Lebanese city of Sidon. - Few of the pro-democracy protesters who took the Middle East by storm a decade ago had a flag to raise or a leader to follow. But all of them had a song to sing. "Hela Ho" was perhaps not the most poetic of protest songs, but it became the undisputed mega-hit amid the demos that erupted in Lebanon on October 17, 2019. It's chorus crudely takes aim at then foreign minister Gebran Bassil and the president's son-in-law -- the face of everything the protesters wanted to get rid of: corruption, political dynasties and incompetence. (Photo by Mahmoud ZAYYAT / AFP) (Photo by MAHMOUD ZAYYAT/AFP via Getty Images)

  • (FILES) In this file photo taken on April 25, 2019, Sudanese protesters open their smartphones lights as they gather for a "million-strong" march outside the army headquarters in the capital Khartoum. - Few of the pro-democracy protesters who took the Middle East by storm a decade ago had a flag to raise or a leader to follow. But all of them had a song to sing. One of the most powerful musical moments of the Arab uprisings took place in central Khartoum in 2019, when Sudanese rapper Ayman Mao climbed on stage. On April 25, having flown straight to Khartoum from the US, he grabbed a microphone at the main sit-in site, and intoned one of his most famous songs: "Blood". With every line, the crowd answered "Thawra (revolution)". But a few weeks later, the title of what had become the revolution's anthem took on new significance. (Photo by OZAN KOSE / AFP) (Photo by OZAN KOSE/AFP via Getty Images)

  • (FILES) In this file photo taken on November 03, 2019 Iraqi demonstrators gather at an abandoned building known as the "Turkish restaurant" overlooking Tahrir square and al-Jumhuriya bridge in the capital Baghdad, during ongoing anti-government protests on November 3, 2019. - Few of the pro-democracy protesters who took the Middle East by storm a decade ago had a flag to raise or a leader to follow. But all of them had a song to sing. The protest movement in Baghdad and other Iraqi cities in October 2019 became a window for the vibrant youth culture and the song "Dhayl Awaj" captured it better than others, literally meaning "crooked tail" and in Iraqi dialect a reference to Tehran's political allies as "tentacles" of the Iranian regime. The sleek camera work showcases all the symbols of the October revolution -- from the "Turkish restaurant" landmark that became the revolution's de facto "command centre" to the tuk-tuks that ferried away the wounded. (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP) (Photo by AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP via Getty Images)

  • (FILES) In this file photo taken on April 25, 2019, Sudanese protesters chant slogans as they gather for a "million-strong" march outside the army headquarters in the capital Khartoum. - Few of the pro-democracy protesters who took the Middle East by storm a decade ago had a flag to raise or a leader to follow. But all of them had a song to sing. One of the most powerful musical moments of the Arab uprisings took place in central Khartoum in 2019, when Sudanese rapper Ayman Mao climbed on stage. On April 25, having flown straight to Khartoum from the US, he grabbed a microphone at the main sit-in site, and intoned one of his most famous songs: "Blood". With every line, the crowd answered "Thawra (revolution)". But a few weeks later, the title of what had become the revolution's anthem took on new significance. (Photo by OZAN KOSE / AFP) (Photo by OZAN KOSE/AFP via Getty Images)

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